Sunday, June 21, 2020

NC SYMPHONY HONORS MATT

From the NC Symphony:

Jackson Parkhurst Award for Special Achievement

The Jackson Parkhurst Award for Special Achievement is named for the Symphony’s former director of education in recognition of his longstanding service and commitment to young people in the state of North Carolina. 

2019/20 Honoree: Matt Fry

Matt Fry, currently in his 32nd year of teaching, is the Chorus Director at Jordan-Matthews High School in Siler City, North Carolina, where he was named Teacher of the Year for 2006/07 and again for 2017/18. He is a graduate of Missouri Western State College in St. Joseph, Missouri, where he received a bachelor’s degree in education, with honors, and was named the Outstanding Graduate in Vocal Music in 1988. He is a member of the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA), National Association for Music Education (NAfME), and North Carolina Music Educators Association (NCMEA).
Mr. Fry taught for 12 years in Caruthersville, Missouri, where his choirs and soloists consistently received “Superior” and “Excellent” ratings at district and state music festivals. He taught for one year at Eaton-Johnson Middle School in Henderson, North Carolina, before finding his home at Jordan-Matthews. His choirs have achieved “Superior” and “Excellent” ratings in the annual North Carolina Music Performance Adjudication. Several of his students have participated in NCMEA’s High School Honors Chorus and All-State Choral Festival.
In addition to his teaching, Mr. Fry is also the director of the Fearrington Village Singers and the choir at Rocky River Baptist Church in Siler City. He sang for nine years with the Duke Chapel Choir and for several seasons with the Vocal Arts Ensemble of Durham, both under the baton of Dr. Rodney Wynkoop.
Mr. Fry is a founding board member of the Jordan-Matthews Arts Foundation, an organization promoting the student artists at Jordan-Matthews. His philosophy of education is inspired the name of his school’s mascot, the Jets: Just do your job. Expect excellence from yourself and others, Teach others what you know, and Show up!

Thursday, January 31, 2019

When I'm Sixty-Four changes

Make the following changes to When I'm Sixty-Four:
Page 7, Measure 54, change 'sixty-four' to 'seventy-four'; change notes for added syllable as shown below.







Page 10, Measure 87, change 'sixty-four' to 'eighty-four'.
Page 11, Measure 93, change 'sixty-four' to 'ninety-four'.

Saturday, January 19, 2019

Comments on music 01/17/19


Comments on music 01/17/19

Edited 01/21/19 to correct changes in You've Got a Friend. DN

A Red, Red Rose – Per past practice, when Matt specifies a break, he means to cut off about an eighth off of the note the break follows and insert an eighth rest. WTD means ‘Watch The Director’ for cutoffs, entrances, etc. Page 2, Measure 6, no break after ‘rose’. Page 2, Measure 7, no break after ‘sprung’. Page 3, Measure 8, break following ‘June’ after the altos and basses move to their last note; WTD. Page 3, Measure 10, no break after ‘melodie’. Page 3, Measure 12, cutoff ‘tune’ on Beat 3 so we don’t cover up the sopranos on Beat 3.5. Page 3, Measure 14, break following ‘lass’ after the tenors move to their last note; WTD. Page 4, Measure 16, slower and break after ‘I’. Page 4, Measure 18, break after ‘dear’. Page 4, Measure 19, no break after ‘gang’. Page 4, Measure 20, break following ‘dry’ after the altos and tenors move to their last note; WTD. Page 4, Measure 21, break following ‘dear’ after the altos and tenors move to their last note; WTD. Page 5, Measure 24, break following ‘I’ after the altos and tenors move to their last note; WTD. Page 5, Measure 26, break following ‘dear’ after the altos and tenors move to their last note; WTD. Page 5 Measure 27, no break after ‘seas’. Page 5, Measure 28, break following ‘dry’ after the altos and tenors move to their last note; WTD because there are fermatas and railroad tracks. Page 6, Measure 34, break after ‘dear/ah’. Page 7, Measure 36, start the cresc on ‘As’ at mp. Page 7, Measure 37, break following ‘lass’ after the tenors move to their last note; WTD. Page 7, Measure 40, WTD because this measure will be slower and there are railroads tracks at the end. Page 7, Measure 42. break following ‘luve’ after the tenors move to their last note; WTD. Page 8, Measures 44 and 45, stay on the ‘ah’ sound (don’t go to the second vowel of the diphthong) and maintain a full tone. Page 8, Measure 47, slowing down, WTD. Page 8, Measure 48, close immediately to the ‘m’ in ‘come’; WTD because of the fermata, railroad tracks, and tenuto. Page 8, Measures 49 and 50, WTD for when to close to the ‘n’ in ‘again’.

You’ve Got a Friend
– Throughout, words that end in ‘-ing’ should be pronounced as written; Matt changed his mind about dropping the 'g'. This starts out with a fairly long solo which we will chop apart and perform by sections. Starting in Measure 4:
Altos: “When you’re down and troubled,”
Sopranos: “and you need a helpin’ hand;”
Altos: “and nothin’, nothin’ is goin’ right. Close your eyes and think of me.”
Sopranos: “and soon I will be there;”
Sopranos and Altos: “to brighten up even your darkest night.”
Page 4, Measure 26, different from what you probably remember, ‘a-‘ and the first part of ‘-gain’ are the same note. Page 5, Measure 33, basses go up from ‘I’ to ‘will’ even though you want to go down. Page 9, Measures 73 and 74, change the rhythm and notes as shown below.




Page 10, Measure 82, tenors take top note, baritones take middle note, basses take bottom note. Page 12, Measures 93 and 94, WTD; there is a fermata, railroad tracks, and a half rest before we come in again.


I Am Loved As I Love
– Page 5, Measure 37, typo in the tenor part – ‘dr-rofts’ should be ‘ef-forts’.
I Love a Piano – Once again we will take the opening solo and have the various sections perform it in increments. Starting in Measure 2:
Sopranos: ‘As a child, I went wild when the band played.’
Altos: ‘How I ran to the man when his hand swayed.’
Tenors: ‘Clarinets were my pets, and a slide trombone’ (Slide between the notes of ‘trombone’.)
Baritones/Basses: ‘I thought was simply divine.’
All women: ‘But today, when they play, I could hiss them.’
All men: “Ev’ry bar is a jar to my system.”
Everyone: “But there’s one musical instrument that I call mine.”


What a Wonderful World - This has a repeat in it. On Page 7, Measure 29, everybody sings melody the first time (top notes); second time, split up into parts, with the altos and basses singing the bottom (baby) notes to provide harmony. At the bottom of Page 12, end of Measure 54, go back to Page 6, Measure 23, on the bottom system where there is a symbol that looks like an 'S' leaning backward with a '/' across it. Sing to Page 8, Measure 36, and then go to the coda on Page 13, Measure 55. If you want to avoid all the flipping back and forth, click on this link to go to a three page PDF. Print the three pages, trim on the outlines to make them the same size as your music, and put them in your music between Pages 12 and 13. If you do this, you sing straight through with no flipping back and forth.